Dear Mind, You Matter

Understanding Your Food Story with Elise Museles

Episode Summary

In this episode, we talk to Elise Museles about discovering your food story and how stress is the anti-nutrient.

Episode Notes

Elise Museles holds four certificates in holistic health and integrative healing. She is on the Environmental Working Group board of directors and has been a National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant recipient for five years in a row. A sought-after speaker, she is also host of the popular Once Upon a Food Story podcast. Her work has been featured in O, The Oprah Magazine, Forbes, Health, Self, ELLE, Well+Good, The Chalkboard, mindbodygreen, and other outlets. Elise’s new book Food Story: Rewrite the Way You Eat, Think, and Live will be released on October 26th. 

https://elisemuseles.com
https://www.instagram.com/kaleandchocolate/ 
https://www.facebook.com/kaleandchocolate/

Memorable Moments: 

2:49 Everyone has a food story. So your food story is a big swirl of many things. It's the way you were raised. It's the messages about food you received from your family and other influential people in your life. It's the advertisements that you absorbed from the media. It’s your positive memories of food and your painful memories of food, and all of that comes together to create a story, which I call your food story, your beliefs about food and the words you say to yourself about food, either inside your own mind privately or out loud. 

5:29 And the further I got into conversations and the more I got into looking at it as a story, the more that I could see that people could understand where some of their behaviors came from or their patterns. And it released a lot of that guilt and shame and blame even.

7:22 If a listener is going back and finding a painful moment, and it could be from a parent or a caretaker who might've said something that stuck with them for a long time or had a behavior that you know, or made you clean your plate or whatever it might be, that we have to always remember that they were well-intentioned and doing what they knew. You know, like nobody wants to impart a negative or traumatic relationship with food. And so I want to make sure that there's not that like, you know, that we, we realize we can forgive and people, they had good intentions and didn't know better.

9:13 Identifying what are some of the major themes will just get you started thinking about your food story. What was the culture like growing up? What was it like at your dinner table? What was your, for many people the mom plays a big role in their food story. So what was your mom's relationship with food and how did she talk about it? Or your dad or whoever your caregiver, your main, the main person in your life who, you know, cooked for you or provided for you. What did they talk about when it came to food and their bodies? What did you observe as a child? Because oftentimes that affects you. 

15:38 So what happens when you're stressed, as you release more cortisol and then your digestion isn't as efficient, your metabolism slows down. It goes way back into you know that original flight or fight mode, and then you don't assimilate all your nutrients as well. In addition to that, I mean, how much pleasure could you possibly be getting from your food, which I think is an important part of the eating experience, when you're constantly thinking those thoughts?

16:28 I realized, oh, just because I'm the poster child of kale, quinoa and superfood smoothies, I'm actually thinking thoughts that are like creating this [negative] response. So, you know, this stress is acting as an anti nutrient. So that's when I realized that, what I said at the beginning, what's in your mind is just as important as what's on your plate.

18:46 Remember there's no such thing as good or bad foods. So that's why I'm saying it like that, but it doesn't matter what you're eating because when you're, whatever it is you're eating, you're choosing to eat that and that your body deserves the same respect. 

19:15 I like to tell people is that, this is going to sound so ridiculously simple, but at the same time, it's so great that it's simple because you could do it right now, the next time you sit down to eat and that is to take three deep breaths before you eat. And that just automatically puts your body into more of a relaxed state. 

20:26  I like to recite a mantra. There's a whole bunch of science behind how a mantra works, but it's just something to kind of, to bring you back into your body, you know, to, to have your head stop with the spiraling thoughts, you know? And so a mantra can be as simple as, “I'm nourishing my body.” It doesn't matter what you say. You can pick, keep it short though so you can say it over and over. 

24:36 So if people are like, I don't even know what to eat? You know, I would say that you want to try to eat food as close to mother nature as possible. So the least amount of processing, the more whole it is, the better off you are. And so even just thinking about having all the colors represented throughout the day is a wonderful place to start and it's visually exciting too, you know, to be able to nourish your body. The more colors do eat, the more nutrients you're putting into your body.

26:00 And also I'm going to add here not to vilify food groups because we need them all. I've been there before and cut out different food groups and that just doesn't work as well. That's not the way that our bodies were built.

28:34 The thing about the food story, you're born into a food story and you pass on a food story and not to put any pressure on parents or people who are around, you know, extended family members, but it really is true.

29:25  I also learned what doesn't matter. And I know that probably sounds really negative, but when you can filter out what doesn't matter, all the little things I used to stress about, all the material things that I thought I had to have, you know, all of those things that kind of weigh you down and cloud your life. This has been an opportunity for more clarity on that.  And so when I realized what doesn't matter, it created more space for what does matter. 

Dear Mind, You Matter is brought to you by NOBU, a new mental health, and wellness app. To download NOBU, visit the app store or Google Play. 

This podcast is hosted by Allison Walsh  and Dr. Angela Phillips. It is produced by Allison Walsh, Ashley Tate, and Nicole LaNeve. For more information or if you’re interested in being a guest on this podcast, please visit www.therecoveryvillage.com/dearmindyoumatter.

Episode Transcription

Allison: Hello and welcome to the Dear Mind, You Matter Podcast. My name is Allison Walsh, I am a long time mental health advocate and Vice President at Advanced Recovery Systems. On each episode I will be joined by my colleague and clinical expert, Dr. Angela Phillips. This show along with our mental health and wellness app Nobu, are just some of the ways we are working to provide you with some actionable tips to take really good care of yourself each and every day.

So sit back, relax, and grab your favorite note taking device. It's time to fill your mind with things that matter

Welcome to this week's conversation with Elise Museles and this is perfectly time considering it’s thanksgiving week, Elise holds four certificates in holistic health and integrative healing.

She's on the environmental working group board of directors and has been a national institutes of health grant recipient for five years in a row. She is a sought after speaker. She is also the host of the popular once upon a food story podcast, her work has been featured in O the Oprah magazine, Forbes health, self, L, Well Good, The Chalkboard, Mind Body Green, and other outlets. Elise’s  mission is to empower people, to create a healthier relationship with food and their bodies by changing what's on their plate. And what's in their minds. Her new book was recently released called The Food Story, Rewrite the way you Eat, Think and Live. 

Welcome Elise. Thank you so much for being on our show today. Would you mind introducing yourself to our audience?

Elise:  Oh, well thank you for having me. I'm a fan already, so it's an honor to be here. So I'm Elise Museles and I am certified in holistic nutrition and eating psychology. I help people with what's on their plate, but also what's in their minds.

And we'll get into that later today. But I'm an author with a new book that just came out called The Food Story, Rewrite the Way You Eat, Think and live. I also have a podcast which is called Once Upon a Food Story. And I'm a mom too, to two grown sons and two dogs, just as much a part of the family. And I grew up in Los Angeles.

I live in Washington, DC, and I have just always been passionate about health and wellness and really helping people to live healthier and happier lives.

Allison:  Well, I'm excited to jump in now. And I know you mentioned it, but let's talk about the book. If you wouldn't mind sharing more about it, who's it for? Why is it important? All of the things. 

Elise: Okay. Great. So the book is called The Food Story rewrite the way you eat, think and live. And if you're listening right now thinking, well, wait, I don't have a food story. I'm going to say you do. Everyone has a food story. So your food story is a big swirl of many things.

It's the way you are raised. It's the messages about food you received from your family and other influential people in your life. It's the advertisements that you absorbed from the media. It’s your positive memories of food and your painful memories of food, and all of that comes together to create a story, which I call your food story, your beliefs about food and the words you say to yourself about food, either inside your own mind, privately or out loud. 

And I want to share how the concept of food story came about, because I think it might be relatable to so many of the listeners and, I'm an attorney, but I'm not practicing anymore. And I learned a lot about, like, the power of storytelling and you know, how you can say things one way and it can get a different response.

And so I was, you know, when I left my career in law and became certified in nutrition, In a holistic nutrition. I was really working with people with what's on their plate. You know, I was very, very focused on that. And then, you know, they would come to me and I, I talked to them about what's on the plate.

I say, tell me about your relationship with food. And it was like, after a while I knew that this was going to be the response. It was the shrugged shoulders. Whoa, you know, it's complicated or let's not go there or, you know what, I feel kind of up against a wall and I could just see in their body language and hear it in their voice.

They felt stuck. And so I knew, you know, drying on like the power of, of, you know, the way you say things and present things. I knew I had it. Just switch gears and say it a different way or ask it a different way. So I started asking people about their food story, and I think about, like story was really, this is back in like 2014, 2013, and story was really becoming sort of part of our language.

I mean, now we hear about what's your money story. You know, you hear a lot of things. So I started asking about your food story and clients would perk their ears up and say, Hmm, I never thought about it like that. I'm like, tell me about the major themes. What were some of the characters who were some of the characters, minor characters, major characters.

Were there any pivotal moments or plot twist? And so all of a sudden it, this whole like relationship with food became so much more dynamic and people grasped onto it. And I realized that when we talk about stories, It's constantly evolving and moving. So you don't feel stuck anymore. And the further I got into conversations and the more I got into like looking at it as the story, the more that I could see that people could understand where some of their  behaviors came from or their patterns. And it released a lot of that lag, guilt and shame and blame even. So that's how it came about.

 And that's sort of what the, you know, that's what the book, the reader will go through a process of discovering their food story and really feeling more empowered around food.

And like some of their patterns or behaviors, aren't really their fault.

Angela: I love that. That's amazing. And, and I know there's so much to uncover there. Uh, one of the things that really struck me when I was reading more about the book is actually gave me a flashback to when I was an undergrad. And I did a research study with an amazing woman who is really looking at fat talk and how that impacts the household and that, you know, I think a lot of people will argue that might be more of a generational thing or I think it carries through actually, even to now, but I think it's really great that you bring up and you reinforce sort of the cultural, societal, familial, you know, components that really shape our food story. 

So I know for a lot of people though, you know, they, they're curious and listening in about what are maybe some of the things we can do to start uncovering that.

So what would you say will really start helping us understand, and even work towards transforming that relationship that we have with food. 

Elise: Once you start realizing a memory, a moment, or you have an aha it then triggers and not in a negative way, like other, other memories. And so it's just, you don't have to put the pressure on yourself.

Like I'm going to understand my entire food story, which happened over the course of my life. But one thing that I want to also say is that if a listener is going back and finding a painful moment. And it could be from a parent or a caretaker who might've said something that stuck with them for a long time, or had a behavior that you know, or made you clean your plate or whatever it might be that we have to always remember that.

There they were well-intentioned and doing what they knew, you know, like nobody wants to impart, a negative or traumatic relationship with food. And so I want to make sure that there's not that like, you know, that we, we realize we can forgive and people, they had good intentions and didn't know better.

So, uh, after saying that, some of the things, I think just starting to ask yourself the questions, like what were, what are some themes? And in my second chapter of the book, I wanted the reader to be able to just have, start thinking about overarching themes. Cause it's just a place to start. So are you someone who, you know, has, there's a story of later, but you know, the story of later is like, you know, that you keep putting things off until the time is right.

And that could be also with taking care of yourself too. For me, I had the story of perfection as a major thing. And my food story, that I had some sort of false belief that if I eat a perfect diet, perfect body, and my life will feel perfect. I mean, that's simplifying it obviously, but I just put so much pressure on myself to do everything perfectly, you know?

And so, that was one of my themes. So I think there could be a story of, you know, of overwhelm. Like you read everything and then you feel overwhelmed and don't know where to start. Or, you know, so there's all these different things and identifying some of when I have eight in the book, but identifying what are some of the major themes we'll just get you started thinking about your food story.

What was the culture like growing up? What was it like at your dinner table? What was your, for many people the mom plays a big role in their food story. So what was your mom's relationship with food and how did she talk about it or your dad or whoever your caregiver, your main, the main person in your life who, you know, cooked for you or provided for you. 

What did they talk about? When it came to food and their bodies, what did you observe as a child? Because oftentimes that affects you. What are some of your beliefs about food, even if you know that they're not true for you now, what were some of the things you believe? So I'll give my example that, I grew up, you were talking about the fat conversation.

I grew up with everything being fat-free. And fat in your food meant fat on your body. And that was like, I believed it. And so like fat was poisoned and, you know, we know better now we know that fat nourishes the brain, babies needed it, you know, for development, all of that stuff. So just thinking about all those things will help you.

What were some of your, like, what was a memorable meal? Like the most positive experience? What was food like? What were your siblings like at the table? So all of those things can help you start remembering your food story. And then if you're going through, like, if you have a challenge, like I call it an unwanted health or eating challenge.

Do you have a challenge that you'd like to get through that you'd like to work through today? Think about when did it start? Because sometimes if it's, it can be tied to a particular moment or time period in your life when other things were happening. So, you know, it could have been a parent's divorced or you moved, and I'm not saying it's always that, but oftentimes you can tie it to that. 

And that helps you understand and feel less shameful or blame, like just aha that's where it came from. That's why I do what I do. So those are some of that, is that enough? Some of the places to start.

Allison: You can keep going, I love this.and I, and I love that, you know, you've really talked about the story. You talked about the themes, the triggers, the life experiences, all of that, because there are so many factors that play into your relationship with food. And I think a lot of people too, just even over the last year and a half, going through the pandemic, it is stressful. Right? I think we've seen it swing both sides where some people now have healthier relationships with food.

Others have the opposite where they've, that's become a coping mechanism. That's become something they've been leaning on. The stress is definitely impacting them. So this is so relevant and I really hope that the questions that you've posed or just the things that you've shared so far. It does cause you to pause and kind of tie all the pieces together.

I mean, I've done a lot of work on the eating disorder side of things and like unpacking my own recovery, like what started all of that. And, but it's so important because you know, we talk a lot about addiction and substance use and everything on, on this podcast and, and just, just  how prevalent it is today.

The biggest difference is that. You know, with addiction and substance use it's recovery is sobriety, right? And a big part of it is sobriety. Whereas your relationship with food is something you have to face every single day, day in and day out. And it's worse taking the time to do the work around your food story and to make a change.

So I love this and I could talk to you about this all day long, but I would love for our listeners to hear some tips from you about how they can better manage their food story, or how they can build a better relationship with food, especially during these stressful times.

Elise: Okay. First of all, I love what you said about, you know, that, how relevant it is right now.

And I think that underneath all of that, it's kind of when we're in stressful times or like a big life changes because we all went through a big life change. And just with what was happening globally at the pandemic that it's, it's sometimes not even really about the food, right. Because. I mean, people were feeling anxious or like I've got to do something.

I have to be in control of how I'm taking, you know? And so we saw both sides. but if you dig deep, sometimes it's not really even about the food, but what's going around you too. So I just want to mention that. So I want to start with. What happens? You were talking about creating a better, like a healthier food story, a better mindset, having less stress, basically.

Right. And when it comes to eating and you're just being around food. So I want to tell you about my big wake up call, because it's something that I talk about all the time and almost every time I do a talk or I share it with a client, you could see that they're like, I had no idea and wow, this is eye opening.

So I will be really short with it. But basically I learned about what happens to your body on a physiological level when you are thinking stressful thoughts while eating. So when I say that I'm talking about things like, am I gonna gain weight or, you know, will I feel bloated? Will I react? Or, you know, even multitasking can be perceived as a stress.

And I'm sure that there are a lot of listeners and probably some hosts here who might say, yeah, I'm guilty of that because I do it too, but it's, there's so much going on in our body and we're thinking about other things, but the point is that our body is perceiving it as a stress. And so what happens when you're stressed, and this could be like a very low level of stress.

So it's not like, you know, a really stressful family member is sick, but you're just thinking these stressful thoughts, the body perceives them as a stress, whether they're true or not, you know, like if you're being chased by a tiger and or you think you're being chased by a tiger you're still going have the same response.

Right. So what happens when you're stressed, as you release more cortisol and then you, your digestion isn't as efficient, your metabolism slows down, you know, it goes way back into you know that original flight or fight mode, and then you don't assimilate all your nutrients as well. In addition to that, I mean, how much pleasure could you possibly be getting from your food, which I think is an important part of the evening experience when you're constantly thinking those thoughts.

And so when, to take it back to my time, when I shared with you that I was really worried about following the perfect diet, you can imagine the monologue going on in my head. Every time I ate. Is this on the plan? Is this allowed? Is this, how many, you know, carbs, this, that, whatever, all of those are perceived as stress.

And so when I learned that, I realized, oh, just because I'm the poster child of kale, quinoa, superfood smoothies. I'm actually thinking thoughts that are like creating this response. So, um, you know, so it's, this stress is acting as an anti nutrient. So that's when I realized that what I said at the beginning, what's in your mind is just as important as what's on your plate.

And so one of the missions of my work in my book, you know, on my podcast is really to help people to learn how not to stress, why stress is so harmful when you're actually eating. You know, forget about the emotional component, but just physiologically. And then, so to get the body, that's the sympathetic nervous system.

You want it to be able to enjoy your food and add, get the most nutrients from your food. You want your body ideally, to be in a parasympathetic sympathetic state, which is a scientific way of saying in a relaxed state. So, I don't want, I'm going to pause here to see if you have any questions. And then we can talk about like a few tips to help listeners become more relaxed around food.

Angela: You have segwayed so perfectly and to just the, you know what, Allison and I talk about a lot, which is how important, so many things are to our mental health, that we don't talk about nutrition being the top of however many.. So that's one of the things that we really wanted to hear more from you about, and sort of really give people either a tangible, you know, tips and tools around that.

But also, you know, our, I know a lot of folks will ask us, you know, are there certain kinds of foods that I should be eating? And there are also some, I think, misconceptions out there as to, sort of, if you're eating a superfood, what does that mean? And does everyone need this to feel, you know, more, I guess an elevated mood, if you're feeling depressed. 

So on and so forth. So yeah, I guess go into your tips and let us know.

Elise: I actually want to say that this conversation is about relaxing around food. It doesn't matter what you're eating, even if you're eating ice cream or whatever, you know, like you're, you know, something that isn't quote “as nutrient dense”, I guess.

So remember there's no such thing as good or bad foods. So that's why I'm saying it like that, but it doesn't matter what you're eating because when you're, whatever it is, you're eating, you're choosing to eat that and that your body deserves the same respect. And you should, if you're choosing to have a food that's as quote “not as healthy”, then you might as well get in pleasure and enjoyment out of it.

You know, cause isn't that the whole point of eating it. Right. So anyway, so one of the things that, you know, I like to tell people is that this is going to sound so ridiculously simple, but at the same time, it's so great that it's simple because you could do it right now. The next time you sit down to eat and that is to take three deep breaths before you eat.

And that just automatically puts your body into a more of a relaxed state. It creates a barrier between like, what's going on, you know, and what's going like all that's running around and floating in your mind, or what's going on that maybe a stress that's happening, you know, with your kids or something in the kitchen it's commotion, or you were in a traffic jam.

So those 3 deep breaths are so calming and so centering. And I know it's trite but it is so powerful and it's accessible to everyone, anywhere, anytime. It doesn't, you can do it quietly in a restaurant. It doesn't matter. You don't have to be sitting in an odd Schrom to take those three deep breaths. So ask all the listeners to try it next time they eat and see if they feel different because it is that powerful.

And then if you want to take it another, like one more step, I like to recite a mantra. There's a whole bunch of science behind how a mantra works, but it's just something to kind of, to bring you back into your body, you know, to, to have your head stop with the spiraling thoughts, you know?

And so a mantra can be as simple as. I'm nourishing my body. It doesn't matter what you say. You can pick, keep it short though. So you can say it over and over. What would be your mantra?

Allison: Well, for me, I mean, I've had to rebuild this whole relationship with food over the last, like two decades. Um, and so I, when it comes to the mantra side, like, I am grateful for the foods that I asked for because it is allowing me to live my best life.

Right, because  food was my enemy for a long time. And I had to really do a lot of work around that and realize all of the benefits of it and how I could enjoy it and how I could, not only I needed it, but it was allowing me the opportunity to really do everything else that I wanted to do in my life. Because if you don't eat, you’re not here, so, you know, a pretty pivotal piece of the day. Right. So, Angela, what about you?

Angela: Yeah for me, you know, I, I am going a lot, but I'm also a runner. So I am always reflecting on how food nourishes my body and gives me the energy that I need to get through the day. And I have animals and people running all over the place. So, I think for me, that's the one thing where I'm just always, always reflecting on that.

And I'll also, you know, obviously showing and, and sort of feeling, grateful in the moment when I sort of stopped myself. Sometimes I do those breaths, but I think also just before we eat here, we always stop. And just talk about whether it's, you know, being grateful or whether it's just, you know, thanking the person that provided the meal.

I know one thing that I've always used in practice, mindful eating is thinking about the process that it took that food to go through to get it on your plate. 

Elise: Yeah

Angela: Or in your sandwich. It's like, if you really thought back to, you know, whether you're a meat eater where that cow came from or whether that plant was pulled from your backyard, now it's in front of you.

I know that's always been something really special, but I think, one thing that you brought up, which I really appreciate, and it, you know, not mattering what it is and that you're making that decision also sort of brings up the thought to me that. Behind that is education that I think a lot of people don't have as to whether or not that food, you know, what that is providing for them.

And so I think that's so important a lot of times. You know, I will take it for granted. I know. And, and maybe you can relate, um, that I do have so much, so many resources and knowledge around, you know, how to read a nutrition label, have access to a lot of really healthy foods, but a lot of people don't have that.

And I know, obviously that contributes towards, you know, what, what we're doing every day and what we're putting in our bodies. So I appreciate you bringing that up,as a decision, but yeah. How do you educate people around that? What's your goal there?

Elise: No, I think you bring up a good point too. And I'm really careful not to do too much with really expensive superfoods.

And you have to put 20 ingredients in your lattes, in your smoothies in the morning. And like we, the earth provides us with everything that we need, you know, and I, I do agree that education. It's very helpful, but we can also make it really basic to, you know, like, like how Michael Paul and you know what he said if you know about plants.

But I think that just bringing it back to basics and also thinking about, also, what's in season too can help you make decisions on what mother nature intended for us, because it's so amazing to me that like in the summer we have all these juicy fruits and vegetables. Well, our body needs hydration more in the summer.

Right. But then in the winter you have more grounding or the fall, even, you know, right now in the fall we have our grounding root veggies and we need that energy. To help us, but I would take it back. So if people are like, I don't even know what to eat, you know, I would say that you want to try to eat food as close to mother nature as possible.

So the least amount of processing, the more whole it is, the better off you are. And so even just thinking about having all the colors represented throughout the day is a wonderful place to start and that you, you know, and it's, it also can, it's visually exciting too, you know, to be able to nourish your body.

The more colors do eat, the more nutrients you're putting into your body. That's one thing. And you know, if, maybe you have an education, but you're trying to teach your children, it's also a really great way to get the kids excited about eating the rainbow or shopping with you at the grocery store or the farmer's market to eat the rainbow.

So that's a really good place to start, and also making sure that you balance your blood sugar every, you know, whenever you eat, because that will help you stabilize your mood and make better choices in your life. Better choices around, you know, for your next meal. And so that really comes from making sure that, you know, the foods are not as processed and that on your plate you represent the three different food groups of having, you know, carbohydrates, protein, and fat and having a balance. And also I'm going to add here not to vilify food groups because we need them all. I've been there before and cut out different food groups and that just doesn't work as well. That's not the way that our bodies were built.

Angela: I think that's great and exactly what you said. I love that you have those two core types. Cause I think that just says so much and it's so easy to remember that. And I know I'm going to plug your Instagram right now, because you mentioned the seasons and sort of going back to the earth and you do such a great job.

I noticed of like incorporating that into your more recent posts. I've loved how you've started bringing in, you know, how do we transition from summer to fall and really get the nutrients and take advantage of that because it's, you know, it's not going to be here forever. And, so I just thought that was.

Elise: But it's also a great way to simplify because then you, the choices are made for you in a, not in a rigid or strict way, but if you follow the seasons, then you know, then you're not like, oh, what do I eat? I have no idea. You know, you're like, oh wait, okay. I get to choose this, this or this. And I like getting excited about the different seasons too.

And, and if you have a farmer's market near you, that goes back to what you were saying about. Connecting to your food or you're working on your relationship with food, you know, thinking about where it came from, you know, who grew it and the whole process of getting it onto your plate and becoming, you know, this delicious meal in front of you is really a very fantastic way to connect here.

Allison: I love the eat the rainbow. I'm totally gonna use that with my kids, because I think I might actually get some broccoli in there because you got to have that green, but it's, it's so important too. And I love the tips about, you know, connecting with the earth as far as where it's coming from. And I love me some acorn squash.

I am so excited that it's fall. 

Elise: I was just going to say that. I am so excited for squash. I'm like I love it. 

Allison:  Yeah. So, but really I also, I would just want to mention too for the audience, I love the tip about eating the rainbow. And I think on top of that, being mindful of the food story we pass along and we mentioned it earlier about our own food stories and reflecting on, you know, what was our mom's relationship with food or those around us and how did we grow up, but being really, really, really aware of what you're sharing with very impressionable minds.

It is so critical from the language we say about ourselves, to what we say about food. I love how you shifted the narrative earlier about nutrient dense, totally using that with my kids too. So thank you.

Elise: The thing about the food story, you're born into a food story and you pass on a food story and not to put any pressure on parents or people who are around, you know, extended family members, but it really is true.

And it was a huge wake up call for me to realize that the thoughts in my own head were not really. Everything's energy. So like if you're stressed, people will feel it and that'll translate to whoever you're dining with or your family members or whatever. So when you heal your own food story and when you create a really positive one, you're helping others with their food story too.

Allison: So thank you so much for sharing that. And this is one of my favorite questions and we ask all of our guests this, but at this point in your life, what matters most to you?

Elise: I love that you asked that and it's interesting because after the year and a half that we've just had, I want to say that I also learned what doesn't matter.

And I know that probably sounds really negative, but when you can filter out what doesn't matter, all the little things I used to stress about all the material things that I thought I had to have, you know, all of those things that kind of weigh you down and cloud your life. This has been. An opportunity for more clarity on that.

And so when I realized what doesn't matter, it created more space for what does matter. And then, you know, when it comes down to it, it's really about for me. I mean, of course my health, but my relationships, you know, having fulfilling relationships and that's, I was going to just say my family. But my other relationships matter too, you know, so family first of course, but just having community and people that you can connect with and having that connection, that's what makes life special, warm, you know, and meaningful.

Angela: Yeah. Might be one of my favorite answers to that question.

Allison: I agree. It's pretty good. Thank you so much for joining us today. Can you share with our listeners how they can follow you on social media or otherwise? 

Elise: Yeah, sure. So I'm kale and chocolate and that's a whole backstory, but that's how I started.

So that's my name on Instagram and all social media channels. But Instagram is definitely the baby. I have a podcast, as I mentioned Once Upon a Food Story and I would like for the two of you to come on to my podcast. So this is a, yeah, we will have so much fun. So that's called once upon a food story, you can get it wherever. 

My website is my name EliseMuseles.com and my new book is The Food Story, Rewrite The Way You Eat, Think, and Live, and it is available wherever books are sold. 

Angela: Amazing. Thank you so much.

Elise: Thank you both for having me. It's such a pleasure.

Outro: Thank you so much for listening to today's episode. If you're not already subscribed, we hope you join us regularly and please leave us a five star review.

Wherever you get your podcasts. We hope that this podcast is beneficial to you and your wellness journey. Dear Mind, You Matter is brought to you by Nobu, a new mental health and wellness app. You can download it today, using the link in our show. We'll talk to you next time. And until then, remember you and your mind matter.